A new revenue stream for songwriters: the marketplace for lyrics.

A new revenue stream for songwriters: the marketplace for lyrics.

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What do you do when you do not know the lyrics to a song? Google it. The results are full of lyric sites that give you access to the lyrics of almost any song, many sporting a boarder of advertisements.

David Lowery, frontman and songwriter for Cracker and Camper van Beethoven, is taking action against the sites he alleges profit from song lyrics but do not pay royalties. After evaluating is primary sources of revenue on the Internet, he came to an interesting conclusion. More people were searching his lyrics than searching to illegally download his music. And he was not receiving any of that revenue. Last year, Lowery released The Undesirable Lyric Website List.

The National Music Publishers Association took notice, and announced that it would send take-down notices to the names on the list. Rap Genius sat at the top of that list.

In an interview with NPR's Planet Money, Rap Genius' founder, Ilan Zechory, said the site should not be on Lowery's list. Zechory argues that the site is more than transcribed lyrics. He says it is a social network: a discussion board for musicians and music nerds. He says artists love the site. Some notable musicians, like Nas and Rick Ross, comment on their own lyrics on the site.

Rap Genius recently announced that, despite its opinion that the site is fair use, it is going to pay rights owners. Zechory noted that it was easier than fighting with music publishers, who have been very successful in suits against other lyric sites.

Source: NPR's Planet Money: Ep. 537 - Hold the Music; Just the Lyrics, Please

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